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Student Voices: Pitching, hitting poised to put Red Sox in Series

§ June 21st, 2016 § Filed under Journalism, NIE News, Student Voices § No Comments

Congratulations to this month's Student Voices writer, Anthony Luti, a high school student from Wilmington.  Check out Anthony's article published on BostonHerald.com.

To the delight of baseball fans everywhere, the sun has 
risen on the 2016 MLB season. That being said, every baseball fan is analyzing their pitching and batting lineups and making firm predictions that they will stand by throughout the 162-game season.

In a season as long as a baseball season, a lot can happen that may damage one’s predictions on their favorite team’s season, such as injuries and trades, but for this prediction I will stand firm on the roster at hand.

Let’s begin with what seemed to be a never-ending storm cloud that hovered over the Red Sox all season last year: the pitching. In order to have a championship-contending baseball team, you need a solid lineup of pitchers that will hold batters to a limited amount of hits each and every time they step on the mound.

For the Red Sox, this was a major issue and the effect was as clear as day: Due to the overwhelming number of mediocre pitchers on the Red Sox pitching staff, they finished the season in last place. However, there were a couple of pitchers, such as Clay Buchholz and Koji 
Uehara, who made their presence felt throughout the season, but with the 
injuries of Buchholz and the fact that Uehara is a closer and does not start out the game, it wasn’t anywhere close to enough.

This year, the Red Sox made a monster free-agency
splash signing pitcher 
David Price, who is one of the best pitchers this league has to offer. On top of that, the Red Sox signed new closer Craig Kimbrel, who not only is a fantastic closing pitcher, but can throw the ball at speeds up to 99 mph.

With the addition of Price and Kimbrel, I 
believe it may just be enough to remove the hovering storm cloud of poor pitching away from Boston.

Concerning the topic of batting, I never doubt the hitting power that the Red Sox can deliver day in and day out.

From first to ninth on the batting order, I see a very firm and confident lineup, with the leadership and power 
of David Ortiz to 
the seemingly magical Brock Holt. I see a championship-contending team and expect nothing less in this 2016 MLB season.

Due to all the information I have provided, I feel that it is appropriate to predict that the Red Sox will indeed be making a World Series appearance this year.

Teachers — you can get your students published in the Herald! To participate, sign up for our free Boston Herald in Education program at BostonHeraldNIE.com.  Visit our Student Voices page to learn more about submission requirements.

Student Voices Deadline: Get your students published in the Boston Herald!

§ April 23rd, 2015 § Filed under Elementary School, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, Student Voices § Tagged , , , , , , , § No Comments

 

Student Voices is a unique writing opportunity for students. Each month, students write about a newsworthy and relevant topic of their choice and have a chance to get published in the Boston Herald print newspaper and website. To participate, respond to any Boston Herald article from the past two weeks in 300 words or less.

Tips for students:

  • Make sure your article is an opinion piece, not a factual article. We want to hear your opinions!
  • Because articles are usually published at the end of the following month, students should choose a topic that will still be newsworthy a month later.  For example, if you wrote about the Super Bowl in January, the articles didn't run until the end of February, so it wouldn't be chosen as it is old news.

Guidelines:

Responses must be no more than 300 words and sent in by the student’s teacher. We will not accept submissions directly from students. Please email responses to kristen.giddings@bostonherald.com by Friday, May 29th.

You may include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

One response will be chosen to be published in the Boston Herald newspaper. All students who participate will have their work published on the NIE Blog.

Because students can write about any topic, it’s easy to integrate this activity into your curriculum for any subject! Teaching journalism? This activity can be integrated into journalism lesson plans while learning about the Op-Ed and Letters to the Editor sections of the newspaper. Refer to the Op-Ed section of the daily Boston Herald as a guide. Read the Smart Edition here.

Find examples of past Student Voices responses here.

Questions? Contact kristen.giddings@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

Student published in Boston Herald: April's Student Voices selection

§ April 17th, 2015 § Filed under Current Events, Student Voices § Tagged , , , , , , , , , § No Comments

Congratulations to this month's Student Voices writer, Katrin O'Grady, a student at the Montrose School in Medfield.  You can check out Katrin's article published on BostonHerald.com here.

Many Bostonians are unaware that at the intersection of Wellesley, Weston, and Newton exists a Nordic skiing hub.

In fact, the Weston Ski Track is the only cross-country ski facility with snowmaking capabilities within two hours of Boston. Weston Ski Track shares land with the Leo J. Martin Golf Course, both owned by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The DCR leases the land to the Weston Ski Track in the winter on a contract basis.

For 40 years, the two sports have shared the same space without a hitch; however, recent modifications by the DCR to improve golf on the facility have decreased available ski turf.

Advocates for preserving the ski track formed Friends of Leo J. Martin Skiing (FOLJMS), a nonprofit organization with a mission to preserve the coexistence of both ski and golf in one facility. The group formed a year ago, when changes to the golf course raised alarm. Orange fences marked off spaces formerly used for skiing. Mounds of dirt littered the normally smooth trails. Skiable terrain was cut by 30 percent.

FOLJMS advocate Elizabeth Wilcox explained the organization’s goals: “FOLJMS has been working with the DCR as it invests in the golf facility to ensure that DCR’s work does not jeopardize the long-term sustainability of 
the ski facility.”

She added that the organization strives to demonstrate to the DCR “how changes made to the golf course impact the ski facility” and “to educate the DCR on the value that the winter facility brings to the Greater Boston community.”

In the 2012-13 season alone, the ski track boasted approximately 30,000 visits in just about four months. The ski track is home to high school and college teams and provides a healthy way for Boston and surrounding communities to stay active in the winter.  

Teachers — you can get your students published in the Herald! To participate, sign up for our free News­papers in Education program at BostonHeraldNIE.com.  Keep your eye on the NIE blog  for the submission requirements.

 

Student Voices responses: January

§ February 23rd, 2015 § Filed under Student Voices § No Comments

Congratulations to our latest Student Voices writer, Monica Stack from the Montrose School in Medfield, found on BostonHerald.com here.

Check out what students had to say when given the chance to choose their own topic in the January round of Student Voices:

At this time of year, high school seniors face the expected “which college” question that unfailingly pops up at family gatherings. My standard response remains, “well my top choice is ____, but we’ll see.” With the nation’s college students battling $1.2 trillion in debt, the choice of “which college” increasingly hinges on costs. So when President Obama announced his initiative to make community college “as free and universal in America as high school is today,” students should have thrown away their financial woes, right? Not so fast. A sampling of college and high school students in the Boston area remains unconvinced that free community college will solve college financing strains. One source of skepticism involves the one-size-fits-all concept of federalizing community colleges. Julia Lay, a senior at the Boston College Lynch School of Education, said that funding for education “should be local because the states are so diverse. We need agriculture schools out west but not in the Bronx.” The federal mandate seems out of sync with varied state needs. Brenna Mitchell, a senior at the Montrose School voiced concern that the attention paid to community college misses the mark for most college-bound students. “A better option, at least in Massachusetts, is to make state schools cheaper or to make government-funded scholarships and grants more accessible. An associate’s degree is a foundation, but that shouldn’t be the limit.” Mitchell’s concerns reflect the pattern among Massachusetts students. Of the 75.6% of high students in Massachusetts who attend college, only 28.3% choose community college, according to a 2012 Massachusetts Department of Education study. While free community college may work in some states, Obama’s plan seems off the mark for the needs of college students in Massachusetts. Consistently, students voice that more effective and wide-reaching solutions should focus on lowering the cost of four-year degree programs.

Monica Stack, Montrose School in Medfield

As the Patriots settle into practice sessions in Arizona, Patriot fans at home are digging out from the confusing media coverage surrounding “Deflategate.” What do high school students have to say about this history-making scandal which calls the Patriot’s reputation for fair play into question? Recent polls show that 68% of Americans hold the Patriots accountable. Eleven out of twelve footballs used to play in the Patriots vs. Colts AFC Championship on January 18th were under-inflated, with the Patriot balls two pounds less than regulation. While national polls cast doubt on the Patriot’s, high school Pats fans in the Boston area remain skeptical about the inflated media coverage. A high school junior from Wrentham, Marie Lacke dismissed the scandal: “The only reason this has spiraled into this enormous of a problem is because the press needs a story to make money.” Lacke added, “Even if the balls were deflated, Tom Brady shouldn't be taking all the heat. He isn't the only player on the team. The entire team had an amazing game. and that skill level at which the Patriots were playing is what led the team to victory. The deflated footballs had nothing to do with it.” An avid football fan from Westwood,  Laura Bergemann put the current scandal in historical perspective: “Deflating the footballs has gone on for over 40 years, with the first recorded incident between the Oakland Raiders and Green Bay Packers. This is not a new problem. If you look at the extreme difference in scores from the most recent game, it is clear that the deflated footballs were not a deciding factor in the winner of the game.” High schoolers in Patriot nation question the media’s motives and fair minded coverage of “Deflategate” more than they doubt the Patriots earned AFC championship.

Margaret Sparicio, Montrose School in Medfield

The desire to be perfect has become an epidemic in today’s society, especially among teenage girls. This struggle with perfection is found in every environment -- from school to sports and extracurricular activities to physical appearances. Perfectionists believe that their accomplishments are failures if they fall short in any perceived way. What advice do teenage girls have for fellow perfectionists? Focus on your own girls and be yourself. Arlene Perez, a 17 year old from Roslindale said, “Focus on your goals and don’t let anything distract you from accomplishing them.” 16-year old Rachel Solomon of Newton added, “What they take into account is what they think other people think of them when in reality, we should only be concerned with our untainted opinion of ourselves.” While seeking perfection seems benign, there are dangerous consequences and side effects. Perfectionists take the desire to be perfect from the realm of external challenges to their internal self-concept. Perfectionism is recognized as a form of fear. Society instills this fear of not being good enough into girls’ minds through magazines filled with underweight models and tips on how to get that “perfect” body or how to find the “perfect” guy. Girls are led to believe that if they don’t follow the steps outlined in the article and mirror the models presented, then they won’t be considered beautiful or be able to find love. Socially-prescribed perfectionists strive to be perfect because they are influenced by others. Depression, eating disorders, anxiety, and low self esteem are common results of perfectionist thinking. While society does place too much pressure on girls to be perfect, staying true to yourself will allow you to accomplish anything.

Rylee Booth, Montrose School in Medfield

Thank you to all of the students who submitted articles to Student Voices. Students can get published in the Boston Herald each month by writing an article in 300 words or less. Find our submission details here, due on Thursday, March 26.

Student Voices March Prompt

§ February 19th, 2015 § Filed under Student Voices § No Comments

Student Voices is a unique writing opportunity for students. Each month, students write about a newsworthy and relevant topic of their choice and have a chance to get published in the newspaper and online. To participate, respond to any Boston Herald article from the past two weeks in 300 words or less.

Tips for students:

  • Make sure your article is an opinion piece, not a factual article. We want to hear your opinions!
  • The articles are usually published  at the end of the next month, so think about the news timeline of your subject. For example, if you write about the Super Bowl in January, the articles won’t run until the end of February, so it won’t be chosen as it is old news.

Guidelines:

Responses must be no more than 300 words and sent in by the student’s teacher. We will not accept submissions directly from students. Please email responses to julie.defrancesco@bostonherald.com by Thursday, March 26.

You may include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

One response will be chosen to be published in the Boston Herald newspaper. All students who participate will have their work published on the NIE Blog.

Because students can write about any topic, it’s easy to integrate this activity into your curriculum for any subject! Teaching journalism? This activity can be integrated into journalism lesson plans while learning about the Op-Ed and Letters to the Editor sections of the newspaper. Refer to the Op-Ed section of the daily Boston Herald as a guide. Read the Smart Edition here.

Find examples of past Student Voices responses here.

Questions? Contact julie.defrancesco@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6223.

Student Voices January: "Write What You Want!"

§ January 7th, 2015 § Filed under Student Voices § No Comments

Write what you want!

This month, we’re trying something new for Student Voices – instead of responding to writing prompts, students can write about a newsworthy and relevant topic of their choice! To participate, respond to any article from the past two weeks in 300 words or less. We want to hear your opinions.

Responses must be no more than 300 words and sent in by the student’s teacher. We will not accept submission directly from students. Please email responses to brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Thursday, January 29.

You may include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

One response will be chosen to be published in the Boston Herald newspaper. All students who participate will have their work published on the NIE Blog.

Because students can write about any topic, it's easy to integrate this activity into your curriculum for any subject! Teaching journalism? This activity can be integrated into journalism lesson plans while learning about the Op-Ed and Letters to the Editor sections of the newspaper. Refer to the Op-Ed section of the daily Boston Herald as a guide. Read the Smart Edition here. 

Find examples of past Student Voices responses here.

Student Voices responses: studying social media

§ December 1st, 2014 § Filed under Student Voices § No Comments

Congratulations to our latest Student Voices writer, Jess Traut-Savino from Salem State University, found on BostonHerald.com here. 

Check out what students had to say in response to "MIT Media Lab gets $10M to major in social studies" on page 2 of the October 2 Boston Herald and the question below:

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology were recently given 10 million dollars to study Twitter in an attempt to find patterns that could tell us more about people and how they interact. What can studying social media help us understand about our culture and society? What forms of social media do you use? What do you get out of it?

“My grandmother has a Twitter!” a friend of mine exclaimed this past week. In this day and age tweeting, instagramming, hashtagging, and facebooking have become common lingo, even for the archetypal computer-deficient grandparent that is now no exception to the madness that is social media. “Twitter” and “tweeting” no longer appear with a red squiggly line as I type them into word processing, and “Obama tweeted such and such” isn’t seen as a shocking form of presidential communication to the public. It is no wonder that MIT researchers are investing substantial money to study the social media sensation that has been sweeping the country since its creation in 2006 --- it is valuable information that provides immediate results about our society and American culture. What are young people doing in their spare time these days? Consult Twitter for up-to-the-second updates. Need to know what the latest fashion trends are? Simply look up #todaysfashion. I created my Twitter account in 2008, following the popular crowd of my high school who considered it the “in” thing to do. After sharing 1,346 tweets with the general public, many of which did not seem to care, I decided to delete my account and have not used it since. I’ve found the peace and simplicity of a non-tweeted life to be oddly satisfying, and strangely enough, often inconvenient as a student. Social media is today’s replacement of a phone call, a thank you note, and even day-to-day school announcements. It’s used by nearly everyone from seven year olds to seventy year olds, casually and professionally. It is a perfect depiction of our society and culture in simple 140-character statements. And love it or hate it, it is not going away. -Jess Traut-Savino, Salem State University

"Studying social media can help us understand various things about our culture and society. Some ways that it could help our community is that it would show us how our community communicates and what our background is. Social media benefits our understanding of our culture because the thoughts that people have and share can contribute to their culture. Social media can be beneficial in many ways if used in the right way. One question we have to think about is how long we should use social media and how we can use it? To begin with, things that social media might teach us about our society include what type of person someone is. Sometimes when people think about this they instantly think about a person being “good” or “bad”. I believe there is no such thing as good or bad people but there is such a thing as good or bad decisions. Not only does social media teach us what type of people are in our society but it also contributes to the idea of what we have to be attentive to, which is also vital as well. This means how much energy we are using, what we are doing all day, if this is the best thing we should do, and what we should do that is more advantageous, not only to us but the world around us. Moreover, learning about our society isn’t the only thing that social media teaches us about. It also gives us an understanding of our culture as well. We can realize this when we think about or observe what kind of context people use or what type of pictures they post. An example would be if I posted pictures ofMeccaand talked about how my religion is Islam or send comments in a different language. You can construct an idea that shows you how I am Muslim. Social media was made to be used for good purposes like communicating with others in a very respective manner. It is crucial to think about why we use social media as we do and if we are using it the right way. We have to reflect on these ideas in order to create a better environment to live in. Before we write anything or do anything we have to think how it will affect our surroundings. As a student I use social networking, specifically Gmail. What I get out of this is helpful knowledge and a chance to explore technology. Though, I have to say that using technology is helpful but I feel exploring through books is very beneficial and more useful. I use my account to turn my work in to my teacher as well as work on online projects. Communicating with my family is another great thing that I love doing, not to mention I also use my account to create drafts that create a positive impact on people in the world. This is how social media can help us understand our society and culture." -Hasna Iqbal, Boston Public Schools

Student Voices November Prompt

§ November 7th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices, Teacher resources § No Comments

Student Voices gives students a unique opportunity in publishing and journalism. See this month’s prompt, as well as the Student Voices rules, below.

Note: You must be subscribed to the Boston Herald in Education program to participate in Student Voices. Don't have the Boston Herald in your classroom yet? Order here.

Read the article "Patrick: Mass in ‘better place’ than 8 years ago" on page 24 of the November 5 Boston Herald, then answer the following prompt.

After the results of the 2014 midterm elections, Governor Deval Patrick stated that he believes Massachusetts is a better place now than it was 8 years ago, but that there is still more work to be done. Do you agree with Patrick’s statement? Why or why not? Do you have faith in Governor-Elect Charlie Baker? What changes do you think we need to make forMassachusettsto become a better place to live? 

Email responses to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Wednesday, November 26. Note: Responses must be emailed by a teacher. Responses emailed directly from students will not be accepted. 

You may include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

Students' responses will be published right here on the NIE Blog, and one student per month will be published in the print Boston Herald newspaper!

Any questions? Contact Brianne at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

Student Voices responses: educational apps

§ October 27th, 2014 § Filed under Student Voices § No Comments

Congratulations to our Student Voices writer for September, Diego Duarte from Everett High School, found on BostonHerald.com here. 

Check out what students had to say about in response to page 20 of the September 8 Boston Herald article "Student apps made grade" and the prompt below:

New iPhone and Android apps, such as iStudiez Pro, Studious, and MyHomework Student Planner, make keeping track of class schedules and homework assignments easy. Remind, Classdojo, and Edmodo let you connect with your teachers outside of class time. Do you think it’s a good idea to use apps to help with school? What are your thoughts on using apps to connect with your teachers? If you have used an app for school before, what did you think of it?

My experience is that using apps for school and education makes learning simple, fast, and exciting. For example, in my computer class my teacher uses Google Docs to send our homework or class work to us and if we have a question we can simply comment on the homework.  My history teacher uses the app Edmodo for discussions. That way, if a student doesn't like to express themselves in class they could do so with the app. There are many apps for any type of school work or class. In my opinion, this is going to be the future of education because today people are using technology for taking notes or even to send them to other students. School is easier with the use of technology. For example, I use my phone as an organizer so I know what time to do my homework and when a project is due. I use my laptop to search for information if I need it during class or if I need to write something down. When I need help on something, I just email my teacher or chat with him on Google +. I get that some schools don't trust their students with using technology, but why punish everyone because one person can’t handle using technology? Give the privilege to students and if they abuse it, take it away from that one person. If they want to limit the use of their technology, there’s probably an app for that or maybe someone will make one. But don't allow it right away. Give it to the students slowly and let them start to use technology to see what they can come up with. In conclusion, technology should be part of education because it’s the most useful tool and it’s easy to be productive while using technology. - Diego Duarte, Everett High School

Thank you to all of the teachers and students who participated in Student Voices. We are still accepting submissions for our October writing prompt about social media in our society, here. Submit to brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by the end of this week.

 

Student Voices October Prompt

§ October 9th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices § No Comments

Student Voices gives students a unique opportunity in publishing and journalism. See this month’s prompt, as well as the Student Voices rules, below.

Note: You must be subscribed to the Boston Herald Smart Edition to participate in Student Voices. Don’t have the Smart Edition yet? Order here.

Read the article “MIT Media Lab gets $10M to major in social studies,” on page 2 of the October 2 Boston Herald, then answer the following prompt.

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology were recently given 10 million dollars to study Twitter in an attempt to find patterns that could tell us more about people and how they interact. What can studying social media help us understand about our culture and society? What forms of social media do you use? What do you get out of it?

Email responses to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Thursday, October 30. Note: Responses must be emailed by a teacher. Responses emailed directly from students will not be accepted.

Please include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

Students’ answers will be posted right here on the NIE blog, and one student per month will be published in the print Boston Herald newspaper!

Any questions? Please contact Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

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